Forty four degrees in the forest…

Forty four degrees in the forest
Canon 5D mk1 converted to IR ƒ11 1/60s ISO160 Voigtlander 40mm

I had to take another look at this view. I can’t leave the property when the temperature is in the high thirties and forties just in case of fire. The fires last weekend were very bad fifty two families are now without their homes in areas that I know well it’s very very sad. It seems that strong winds blew a power pole over on private property, the cables arced and caused the fire and the wind fanned the flames very quickly. I really feel deeply for all the people affected but it could happen to anyone who lives in the Darling Ranges we are more than most, subject to the forces of nature even though there is the possibility that it may have been caused by human error. One only has to look at the magnificence of this place, so why would any one want to leave! The volunteer fire brigade with the help of water bombing managed to get the fires under control on the second night with help from the overnight cool temperatures and the laps in the wind, they truly wonderful people. After four days cool temperatures 25 – 29 degC today again the temperature has risen to thirty nine, we cross our fingers and live in hope…

Four Dollars : Street tree series continued

Four Dollars : street tree series continued...
Leica M2 ƒ11 1/250s 40mm Summicron Agfa 100 ultra C41 developed as B+W 1:50 Rodinal 10 minutes finished in Silver Effex.

I think this is a Queensland Box tree which unusually has been left intact. Generally in this part of the world if a tree grows its fair game to be hacked and butchered into something that does not resemble a naturally grown tree at all. This tree provides deep shade for the front of the house and garden which is something Western Australian natives often fail to do. It always seems that where trees that provide good shade are needed the WA natives are planted and along roads where there is no parking there always seem to be good shade trees. A deceased good friend of mine was  keen observer of such conundrums, Harry called it Sods law and in such cases a sod it is!

Ice cream cone furniture…

Ice cream cone seat, Norgen Vaaz,Midland,Western Australia Olympus OMD EM-5 ƒ8 1/40th ISO 500
At some point in my career I might have described Ice cream cone furniture like this as pure kitsch. But seen in context it really is no different to the shop signs of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries where craftsman and shop traders hung symbols of their trade above their shop entrances. I remember some of the older towns from my original homeland where there were any number of these symbols in the High street. Boots for shoe shops and cobblers, the striped poles for barbers, a large fish for fish mongers and so on. Quite honestly I think any child would see these ice cream cone seats and tables as a welcome addition to an out side al fresco area. And oh yes they are quite comfortable…